How Does the Refugee Crisis Affect Europe? Part II

A review of refugee interviews exposing attitudes and reasons for migration.

Map of Europe re: How does the refugee crisis affect Europe?

Courtesy of 123RF Stock Photo/Ildogesto

Though much less dramatic than the thousands storming the European border crossings, their stories need to be told. The incredible and prolonged intrusion into the lives of the ordinary folk in European countries, presented in last week’s post, might be justified if every undocumented person sought freedom from the horrors of war in Syria. Here’s the rest of the story: How Does the Refugee Crisis Affect Europe? Part II.

Millions of refugees from the wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Syria have received the proper approval for asylum. The average time to process an application for asylum in the States is two years. The processing time varies in Europe, but in every country the primary focus relates to security for their own citizens.

Then, in September everything changed. The processing of official applications for asylum, including legal documents, proper security checks, and interviews simply evaporated.

How Does the Refugee Crisis Affect Europe?

A review of the flip-side of the migration tragedy

Map of Europe re: How does the refugee crisis affect Europe?

Courtesy of 123RF Stock Photo/Ildogesto

While news clips of pregnant women and children fleeing war tear at everyone’s heart, have you considered how thousands and thousands of undocumented foreigners suddenly pressing through the frontiers change the lives of average citizens in the border countries? The media focuses on the asylum seekers, but they’re not the only innocent victims. How does the refugee crisis affect Europe?

For the past few weeks, I’ve been listening to the unfolding migration crisis from our headquarters in Europe. I’ve augmented my routine American news podcasts with daily reports from radio stations in Germany, France, England, Ireland, and Switzerland. Each day interviews with local leaders and volunteers trying to cope grab listeners’ attention,

Five Steps to Building Faith Part II

An easy-to-follow guide for Christians wanting to move mountains

Matterhorn, Switzerland RE: Five Steps to Building Faith II

Courtesy of 123RF Stock Photo/Skouatroulio

Though online marketing makes it possible to download about anything we need in a matter of minutes, I’ve yet to find a site offering an amazing, never before seen deal on gigabytes of faith. In last week’s post, I shared the first three steps of a faith-building model that’s worked for me over three decades of foreign service. Today, I’m excited to share the final segment of the process in five steps to building faith Part II.

I’ve trimmed down each of the first three steps from the last post to set the stage for the final episode.

Five Steps to Building Faith

An easy-to-follow guide for Christians wanting to move mountains

Matterhorn, Switzerland RE: Five Steps to Building Faith

Courtesy of 123RF Stock Photo/Skouatroulio

How many times have you wished you had more faith? If you’re like me, you just want to push your life cart right over to those huge bulk containers off of Aisle Five and scoop out a couple more measures. Okay, no humongous spiritual warehouse exists, but over the decades, I’ve discovered five steps to building faith, and I’m excited to share them.

One Summer Day for African Kids

A photo-filled report of a routine day for kids at the Samaritan House Children’s Center

In 2007, the doors of the Samaritan House Children’s Center opened, changing the lives of dozens of underprivileged kids forever. These small gangs of preschoolers no longer roam the dirt streets in our African city, playing with detritus such as broken razor blades. For the past eight years, they and their older siblings have gone to school every day, ending with a hot meal. The account of this one summer day for African kids describes the daily routine for summer 2015.Dannie with kids re One Summer Day for African Kids

Opening Session

The younger kids arrived early to play with their friends. The teens are as adolescents around the world—sprinting to cross the threshold as the bell rings.